Tag Archives: anxiety

Travel Buddies

The previous evening, chilling in my PJs, I met Stu. He was from Canada, had been travelling for seven months, with another three to go. We chatted and laughed. Went for a beer and bought takeaway pizza. It was nice to feel a connection with someone. I’d been sad to leave that behind in Berlin.

In the morning we exchanged numbers. “Leave your data on so I can message and come find you when I’m ready. Check your phone, like, every five minutes.”

I laughed, “Every five minutes? You’ll be lucky if I check it every hour.” I wasn’t joking. Travelling alone, separated from everyone, I was enjoying it. I didn’t want to feel attached to my phone waiting for a text. I wasn’t even sure I wanted company.

The weather was brighter but chilly, the sky had cleared. My plan was to cross the Charles Bridge, visit Prague Castle, and then go to the monastic brewery.

I caught the number 22 to Narodni Trida and from there walked the streets until I found the Charles Bridge. I wasn’t in a rush. I was happy to see where the roads took me. Continue reading

The Berlin Wall

Yesterday was hard. In a way that made me not want to talk about it. I guess because I felt silly, or maybe because I was simply struggling to find the words to explain it suitably.

After a night of good food, great company, and fine discussion, I slept peacefully. I woke the next morning full of beans, and ready to embrace the bright and beautiful day. The weather here really was gorgeous.

I was up and out of the house by 10am ready to do a walking tour using ‘The Berlin Experience’ route from my guide book as a, well, guide.

I took the S-Bahn from Wollankstraße to Nordbahnhof, and walked up through the Berlin Wall Memorial.

There was a group of students in bright blue hoodies following a guide around the site. I hung back and waited for there to be distance between us. Continue reading

Trust your instincts

Almost every day I wake up anxious. I’ve learnt over the years to simply try to take a deep breath, acknowledge that a chemical reaction is occurring in my body, refuse to give that anxiety a name, and move on. Sometimes it’s as easy as it sounds, but other days, not so much. Continue reading